Introduction

How to tell whether a VPN is safe for your family’s account

Posted November 18, 2018 MULTI-BASE VPNS ARE HAVING A BATTLE ROOM WITH THE FUTURE OF FAMILY INTERNET SERVICE PROVIDERS MOST PEOPLE HAVE A PASSWORD AND A VISA THAT WORKS ON THEIR DEVICE.

But that doesn’t mean all VPNs are safe.

We spoke to three experts on the subject and found out whether the best VPNs can protect your privacy and keep your internet traffic private.

They’re all rated on four key parameters: privacy, security, data and speed.

Key features of a VPN: Privacy Privacy is the number one concern for many VPN users.

While you don’t need to give your password to a VPN provider, it’s a good idea to set up two-factor authentication (2FA).

That’s when a smartphone, such as a smart phone or tablet, is connected to your computer to help you log in and make transactions.

The data protection factor is also critical.

The VPN will only store your login and session information if you explicitly allow it.

It can be a good thing, but not necessarily a must.

Privacy isn’t just about your personal data.

You should also know how to manage your internet usage to avoid data breaches.

Security The last thing you want is to be caught out by a data breach.

If you’re concerned about privacy and security, you should set up 2FA with your VPN provider.

To do this, you’ll need to enter your password into your provider’s secure terminal.

Then you can click ‘Set Up a VPN Account’.

If the setup is successful, your password will be entered into the terminal and the VPN will begin to log in to your account.

Data protection factor This factor can be an indicator of the best way to protect your family internet traffic.

In general, you need to set this factor to ‘good’ or ‘very good’.

The average data protection level for VPNs is ‘good’, but it depends on the VPN provider and how much data they store.

“VPNs that are good for data protection and data security tend to be higher in privacy than VPNs that store data for a long time,” says Dr Sarah MacDougall, a senior research scientist at the University of Sydney.

For example, a VPN that stores your login information for five years will be a higher data protection standard than one that stores that data for five minutes.

That can be very useful if you need your family to use a VPN when travelling or you want to restrict your family online activity.

Speed If you don, like many, rely on your internet connection to make payments, it may be beneficial to set your internet speed to a ‘very high’ speed, but it’s not necessary to set it too high.

As Dr MacDougal says, the internet is slow at the moment.

And while VPNs tend to offer more data protection protection than those that don’t, it is important to make sure that your VPN is up to snuff when it comes to security.

Data protection factor for internet speed: ‘good, very good’ Data protection level: ‘very bad’ Speed: ‘poor’